SaveTheLocust.Com
Locust laying eggs in native grassland
Locust laying eggs in native grassland
Locust inhabit natural grasslands throughout the world
Locust inhabit natural grasslands throughout the world
Australian Bustards regularly follow Locust migrations
Australian Bustards regularly follow Locust Migrations
Egg-beds in native grassland
Egg-beds in native grassland
Locust poo, collected by ants
Locust "poo", collected by ants
Hopper locusts on native grass
Hopper locusts on native grass
The Endangered Plains Wanderer often Feeds on Locusts
The Endangered Plains Wanderer often Feeds on Locusts
Vast flocks of Ibis attracted by the locust migration
Vast flocks of Ibis attracted by the locust migration
"When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world." ~ John Muir

2010 Locust Campaign (Victoria)

Introduction

Locust migration or "plagues" as they are commonly called have been a part of the natural world for millennia. As they naturally occur in grassy landscapes, their presence has often created difficulties for agriculture. However locusts are also important wildlife species and should not be viewed only as pests. The question has always been, "how do we most efficiently get rid of these pests?" rather than stepping back and considering their place in the ecosystem.

Locust migrations are a natural ecological event; they have a profound influence on the function of ecosystems, not dissimilar to climatic events in their effects over a large area. This is especially true in endangered grassland ecosystems in Australia where cycles of drought, flood, fire and locusts would have shaped the evolution of the environment as we see it.

Whilst locust swarms may seem abundant and impossible to destroy, this is not the case. The American Rocky Mountains Locust - went from "plaguing" to extinct in a matter of decades. Australian Plague locust (Chortoicetes terminifera) swarms have been dramatically reduced in frequency and extent in modern times. This may seem like a triumph to some, but to the more ecologically minded, it should be serious cause for concern.

There needs to be a balanced view where environmentally sustainable methods of living with locusts are investigated. Yes, there will continue to be some crop damage in the event of a "plague", but the environmental benefits that such a "plague" brings need to be considered.

The aim of this website is to raise awareness of the role locusts play in the environment and to encourage people to move away from the attitude of fear of locust swarms. It also seeks to stimulate interest in such management solutions as will enable locust swarms to provide environmental benefits whilst permitting the survival of sustainable agricultural practices at the same time.

Recent additions to this site.


Last Modified: Monday, 7 February 2011
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